Oven Gloves Tutorial 39


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Sewing Bee Fabrics Tutorial
Make Your Own Oven Gloves

How to make your own oven gloves

This year for Christmas, I decided to make oven gloves! It's something most people will use and can be so easily personalised to different tastes with different fabrics.

What you will need:

Only use material and bias binding that you would happily iron at a high temperature. For that reason I used 100% cotton with cotton bias. I would recommend against satin bias for this project, or anything with a lot of metallic threads as these may be a little more prone to melting under high temperatures.

You need rectangles 18cm x 86cm for the main panel:
2 x cotton (if you are using a pattern that has an obvious right-way-up, you may want to cut 2 halves (adding a seam allowance) and join in the centre so that whichever way around you hang them, your pattern looks right)
1 x wadding (I used 7oz)
1 x insulated wadding

Then 18cm x 20cm for the pockets:
4 x cotton
2 x insulated wadding

Also approx. 2 1/2 metres cotton bias binding
Quilt basting spray makes the job much easier so I'd recommend using this too.

How to make it:

First, find a dinner plate. Use this as your guide to get perfect curves. I marked mine on paper to make sure I was cutting the same each time. I cut on the fold for the main pattern piece to save paper. Mine gave me a depth of about 6cm difference between the centre and edge. Place the edge of the plate completely central at the end then mark off the corners to trim off. Repeat at both ends on the long rectangle main pieces and 1 end on the short pocket pieces.

Oven glove tutorial sewing bee fabrics cutting out pattern
Oven glove tutorial sewing bee fabrics cutting wadding
Oven glove tutorial sewing bee fabrics pattern and pockets

Attach the layers together ready for sewing. Start with your long rectangle main pieces. Line it up so you have 1 x cotton pattern down, insulated wadding with fleece side down/shiny side up (so it's less likely to show through lighter patterns) then your wadding, then finally your last piece of cotton with the pattern facing up. This will be the best side to attach the pockets to, so if you are using different patterns, be aware the top will be the side on show.

Now we are going to make a pocket. Start out the same, with 1 cotton pattern down, insulated wadding in the middle with the white side against the piece of cotton you want at the front, then cotton with the pattern facing up.

Peel back your layers on half your piece for both pockets and the main section, then spray quilt basting spray between each layer, starting at the bottom and moving up. Make sure you smooth out and press down firmly each layer as you go. Once finished, repeat on the other half. Now pin into place liberally. The firmer everything is held together, the less likely it is to start moving when your sewing.

Oven glove tutorial sewing bee fabrics layering pockets
Oven glove tutorial sewing bee fabrics quilt basting spray layers

Next, you need to sew the layers together through the body of the main piece to keep the fabrics flush - this is called quilting. You have 2 main choices for doing this easily - either use a walking foot to make straight lines e.g. opposing diagonals throughout to give a diamond effect. Or, what I prefer to do is to use a free motion foot. On the side I attached the pockets, I used the free motion foot to emphasise around patterns and doodle in free spaces to give the pattern a 3d appearance.

Oven glove tutorial sewing bee fabrics quilting free motion butterflies

Once finished, trim any edges not perfectly aligned, then either using a zigzag stitch over the edge or stitching very close to the edge, sew right around the edge of the panel you have just finished.

Oven glove tutorial sewing bee fabrics over edge stitch overlock main panel

The pockets are small enough not to need quilting, so I just sewed an over edge stitch around the whole piece (a stitch very close to the edge would work here too).

Repeat with the other pocket.

Next, you need to attach bias binding to the top of your pockets. You can simply fold the bias binding over the edge and sew in place, but I prefer to use a bias binding foot to help keep it perfectly lined up so your stitching and binding is uniformly straight. I don't bother to cut the binding between pockets. I simply press the edge of the second one between the bias binding leaving about a cm in between for neat trimming after.

Oven glove tutorial sewing bee fabrics attatching binding to the top of pockets

To attach the pockets to the main panel, line up the centre bottom first and pin up the edges. Sew in place again with either a stitch close to the edge or an over edge stitch.

Oven glove tutorial sewing bee fabrics lining up pockets
Oven glove tutorial sewing bee fabrics attaching pockets

Lastly you just need to apply bias binding right around the edge of your oven gloves. To hide your join, what I do is to leave about 3 inches binding loose before I start stitching. Make sure you keep tension on as you turn the bias binding around the curves. I find it helps to line up only very small sections of a curve at a time, then you are less likely for the binding to skip out of place. Once you get near the end, leave about 3 inches not sewn down, and an extra couple of inches on your bias binding before you cut.

Oven glove tutorial sewing bee fabrics attatching binding

Join your 2 tails of binding by placing them right side together and pin. Check if you need to move your pin further away or closer for a perfect fit. Sew along the pin line. Trim off the excess. I tend to use pinking shears as the zigzag edge created is less likely to fray, making your join more durable. Place the binding flush to the edge then simply sew down.

Oven glove tutorial sewing bee fabrics attaching the end of the bias binding

Voila! It's done!

Oven glove tutorial sewing bee fabrics finished full glove

I then repeated it a few times in different fabrics for various people!

Oven glove tutorial sewing bee fabrics butterfly how to make DIY potholder
Oven glove tutorial sewing bee fabrics how to make deer DIY potholder
Oven glove tutorial sewing bee fabrics flower how to make DIY potholder
Oven glove tutorial sewing bee fabrics kitchen how to make DIY potholder

I also made a child's version to go with a play kitchen this Christmas too. I was worried that as adult ones make it ok to touch hot things that a toy one would too, so I fully insulated this in exactly the same way with one exception... I also added wadding to the pockets and quilted this slightly too as children are more likely to touch the backs of their hands for more than a split second on the sides of an oven or on the oven door. I made this one 55cm x 12cm with 14cm deep pockets.

Oven glove tutorial sewing bee fabrics child play kitchen

We hope you enjoy our tutorials and love hearing what you think so please leave us a comment.

Happy Sewing!

 


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